Apr 152016
 

There is little I am more passionate about in life than poetry. Reading and writing is my life blood.”

FrankRutledge2

How and when did you decide, or discover, that you were to be a writer?

From first grade on I was in love with the alphabet. Interesting fact: I was able to recite the alphabet backwards. Reading vicariously came next. Magazines, books and cereal boxes were the sources but if you stood still long enough I would read your mind. To this very day I love reading. Writers are first readers. Also, from a young age I easily grew bored. Nothing seemed to interest me. Until Sophomore year HS and I discovered The Illustrated Man and Dandelion Wine by Ray Bradbury. Continue reading »

Apr 142016
 

The first poem that blew me away was “Auto Wreck” by Karl Shapiro and the book that really influenced me back then was Winesburg, Ohio.”

MarcFrazier

How and when did you decide, or discover, that you were to be a writer?

Reading and writing in high school started me down the path of becoming a writer. I first was a lover of literature and knew I wanted to study it in college and grad school. The first poem that blew me away was “Auto Wreck” by Karl Shapiro and the book that really influenced me back then was Winesburg, Ohio. My English teachers in high school would read my writing to the class when we wrote creatively and the literary magazine published two of my poems. All of my work was apocalyptic which changed drastically over the years. I really began writing more seriously after my university years when I was involved with my teaching career. Continue reading »

Apr 132016
 

I believe art of every genre has the power to help heal our minds and souls.”

DeVeau Headshot

How and when did you decide, or discover, that you were to be a writer?

I went to work in a factory immediately after graduating high school, got married two years later, started a family, and began attending college at night. The company’s Executive Vice President once asked me if I could write as well as I spoke. That question got me thinking seriously about the possibility of becoming a writer and I began to work toward that goal. Continue reading »

Apr 122016
 

I get a lot of mileage from writing as fast as I can and then sifting out the unnecessary. I revise later after a poem has rested, like good steak.”

JenMay

How and when did you decide, or discover, that you were to be a writer?

My parents often read aloud and encouraged playfulness with words. I also come from a family of writers, so I was naturally attracted to creative writing courses during my high school and college years. I was graced with becoming the editor of the literary magazines Byzantium and Towers, respectively, and it was then that I started to explore poetry as my own unique voice. Gifted teachers Ellen Ljung, Jean Whiteman and college professor Amy Newman all challenged me to find ways to let that voice loose. Continue reading »

Apr 112016
 

Like all the arts, poetry involves artifice, and can never be merely the stating of a feeling. Wordsworth said it best: ‘Poetry is emotion recollected in tranquility.'”

JoanColby2

 

How and when did you decide, or discover, that you were to be a writer?

From the time I was a young child, I was an eager reader and was also lucky to be encouraged by my father who read to me from Shakespeare, the Odyssey, Dickens, Kipling, Scott, etc. I began to write my own little stories. I think I always knew I would be a writer. In my day jobs, I’ve worked as a journalist, editor and teacher of writing, so it was always a focus. Continue reading »

Apr 062016
 

It’s National Poetry Month, so the April Waterline Writers event is full of poetry! We’ll feature two poets with recent books from Glass Lyre Press, publisher of “Exceptional works to replenish the spirit.” Marc Frazier will read from Each Thing Touches and Joan Colby will read from Ribcage, which won the 2015 Kithara Book Prize. From Open Sky Poets, we welcome the return of Waterline audience favorite, Frank Rutledge, and newcomer Jen May to our list of over 125 featured writers. Our final writer, Richard DeVeau, is also one of our venue’s featured visual artists this month. Surrounded by his paintings, he’ll share essays on art’s power to heal.

Waterline WritersSunday, April 17th 2016 at 7 pm, will be held in the art gallery at Water Street Studios, 160 S. Water Street, Batavia Illinois, 60510. Admission is $5/$3 students! Writers can join our 5-minute-limit Open Mic at 8:30. Writers: We want your submissions! Find submission information at: http://waterlinewriters.org/faqs-submissions/.

Mar 182016
 
AnneVeague

Photo of Anne courtesy of Jaime Foster

Think of the pervasive role that fear played, then imagine the urgency to communicate what was feared—a predator you escaped, an approaching fire, the dream you had, the moon that turned blood red during your watch, the plant your child ate before dying—and you begin to grasp the power of stories and storytellers.”

How and when did you decide, or discover, that you were to be a writer?

In second grade we’d select a picture from a magazine and paste it on the top half of an oversized piece of construction paper, then write a story about it on that wide-ruled paper with the dashed center line, and paste the story on the bottom half. I loved that. I still have some of them, of course.

Describe your writing process.

Hmm, writing process … what a good idea! I’m pretty undisciplined but whenever I sit down to write, I can. I don’t know where it comes from. I usually find out what I’m writing about as I go. I spend way too much time revising—but it has a tactile dimension, the feel of things fitting into place. In the piece I’m reading for Waterline Writers, I had to get the sound and placement of each word exactly right before the next step would appear. I spent a lot of time deep in the thesaurus exploring the fullness and nuances of meanings, letting linked entries open new pathways and connections.

What was the inspiration behind what you’ll be reading at Waterline?

“Aspects of the Dance and Other Apparitions” imagines the cyclical re-creation of the world, the evolution of consciousness, the emergence of stories and beliefs. It draws freely from several traditions, but goes back further, to access how our experience of the natural world would have shaped the early architecture of our minds, our primitive understanding of self, of whether things occurred randomly, or magically, or whether you could predict or control your world and your reality. It is also a celebration of the infinite wonders our planet home presents to us—wonders that shaped our consciousness in ways that are now hidden by time or taken for granted.

How did early humans distinguish between inner experience and outer reality? Between dreams, thoughts, imagination and even hallucinations due to pain, illness and fever, extreme hunger and all manner of plants and fungi eaten to assuage that hunger? Think of the pervasive role that fear played, then imagine the urgency to communicate what was feared—a predator you escaped, an approaching fire, the dream you had, the moon that turned blood red during your watch, the plant your child ate before dying—and you begin to grasp the power of stories and storytellers. Think of how stories could be used and misused to manipulate fears, to influence minds and behavior. We have come so very far in so many ways, but if we can more clearly imagine our origins, maybe we can see how profoundly fear still affects our ability to think rationally and we can learn to examine our own beliefs more objectively.

What are you working on now?

Several stories, including the final piece of “Aspects”. I’m reading the first section–there is still a piece missing before the ending. I can’t wait for it to come.

Mar 172016
 

BakulBanerjee

The natural world excites me. Most of my poems are somehow or other connected with nature. Recently, I have been writing poems inspired by Indian literature and history.”

How and when did you decide, or discover, that you were to be a writer?

Although I chose science and mathematics as my field of study, my parents instilled a love of literature and philosophy in me from childhood. I wrote poems in my teen years, but did not write anything other than technical papers as I worked and raised my two daughters. Once they grew up I began writing poems, essays and stories.

Describe your writing process.

Since I spent many years working as a scientific professional along with many volunteering engagements, I became used to writing in “stolen time,” that is, I wrote whenever I found time. I think about a piece for a long time, trying to jot down ideas in my notebook that I always carry with me.  Mind-mapping is a technique that I find helpful. I try to write in the morning and to revise in the evening. Since it is mostly for my own enjoyment, I use accumulated memories, travel experiences and knowledge, without doing much research. My research usually involves fact checking.

What was the inspiration behind what you’ll be reading at Waterline?

The natural world excites me. Most of my poems are somehow or other connected with nature. Recently, I have been writing poems inspired by Indian literature and history.

What are you working on now?

I am working on a collection of poems. There is a collection of essays in the pipeline as well.