Dec 072016
 

Waterline will feature storyteller Kimberly Gotches and showcase many of Teen Writers and Artists Project‘s teen poets, plus Director Diana Zwinak and Teaching Artists Adam GottliebCorey Dillard and Shayne Morgan Phillips at our next event on Sunday, December 18th, at 7 PM. As always, the event is held at Water Street Studios, 160 S. Water St., Batavia, IL.

T-WAAP (TEE-wop) is hard at work right here in the western suburbs. In addition to 3 Wordplay writing workshops, open mics, and featured performers monthly, they offer school assemblies, mentor poetry teams, and host the annual spoken word poetry competition, Slammin’ the Sun Down, a preliminary event for poets preparing for Chicago’s famous Louder Than A Bomb competitions in February and March. Watch the T-WAAP video for a look at what they are up to!

twaap1

T-WAAP is poised to make its programs available to many more teens in the next few years. We are offering you a front-row-seat experience and a look behind-the-scenes as young poets hone their craft, reveal their fears and heartaches, and share their insights, energy and enthusiasm.
Admission is $5 ($3 for students).
No Open Mic on Dec. 18th.
We’ll have craft beer from Solemn Oath Breweries for $5, wine from Bright Angel Wines for $5 and fantastic food from Gaetano’s Market!

 

Nov 182016
 

Before each Waterline Writers event we conduct a short interview with each of our featured writers. This month Sandra Marchetti shares information with us about her background, method and inspiration.

marchetti

How and when did you decide, or discover, that you were to be a writer?

I entered a story competition in fourth grade (I was maybe 10?) and won second place. I suspect it was earlier than that when I knew, though. My mother helped me to bind the book with this hideous orange yarn she had around the house. My parents have always been my biggest supporters. We used to draw together and they read me endless stories, and made up many for me. I was an imaginative only child. We had an imaginary society of elves living in our house that did amazing things and ate cookies. The elves even had their own jail! So, I always had a love of stories and would hole myself up in my room and read chapter books all night oftentimes. However, Sharon Olds was probably the first poet who made me feel like, “I could do this,” regarding poetry.

Describe your writing process.

How do I start writing a draft? Well, often it begins with a walk. I’m kind of a wannabe transcendentalist in that way. Sometimes I’ll see or hear something that sparks a poem, or more likely in the last couple years, reminds me of a line from someone else’s poem, and then I’ll want to write.

What was the inspiration behind what you’ll be reading at Waterline?

I have two full-length poetry collections in progress I’ll be reading from—one on writers who have become my influences, appropriately titled “Menageries” for now (I suppose it’s about poetry-as-collecting)—and one about being a third generation, die-hard Chicago Cubs fan. It’s a book about listening to baseball games on the radio, going to games with my dad, and generally crying a lot. Sports are the ultimate metaphor, and baseball is akin to the spiritual in my world. I can’t get enough of writing about it.

What are you working on now?

See above!

Nov 172016
 

Before each Waterline Writers event we conduct a short interview with each of our featured writers. This month Patrick Shannon shares information with us about his background, method and inspiration.

shannon

How and when did you decide, or discover, that you were to be a writer?

We had some good story tellers in my family and I am just the first one who started writing stories down.  However, an important thing was that from a very young age, I realized that people die and that  before they did I needed to listen to them very carefully when I was with them.  So I have been able to incorporate their experiences with mine.  It’s been like living multiple lives.

Describe your writing process.

The bad news for other writers is that I have never had trouble writing.  The secret is to get a couple of paragraphs down on paper, whether you have any idea where a story is going or not.  Writing is like building a fire.  You start with twigs and a match.  When it gets going, it feeds itself.  And this is even true when you start your writing in the middle of the story.  The fire spreads both directions.

What was the inspiration behind what you’ll be reading at Waterline?

I wrote the piece originally for a magazine in Dublin.  Based on their rejection of it, they killed it having only read the title.  They told me that the only use Dubliners to write stories about pubs.  As for inspiration, I love Irish pub life.  They are places where people tell stories.  All they ask is that you listen and tell yours.  (And sometimes, after the drinks have been flowing, you are also required to sing.)

What are you working on now?

Since I am unemployed (and my outlook is dismal) I have picked up two unfinished novels to see what I can do with them.

Nov 162016
 

Before each Waterline Writers event we conduct a short interview with each of our featured writers. This month William Hazelgrove shares information with us about his background, method and inspiration.

hazelgrove

How and when did you decide, or discover, that you were to be a writer?

I began writing when I got out of college and never looked back.

Describe your writing process.

I write in the morning before the day becomes crazy.

What was the inspiration behind what you’ll be reading at Waterline?

I will be reading the first chapter of Madam President The Secret Presidency of Edith Wilson. She ran the White House from 1919 to 1921.

What are you working on now?

Forging a President: How the Wild West Created Teddy Roosevelt is out next spring.

Nov 152016
 

Before each Waterline Writers event we conduct a short interview with each of our featured writers. This month Lynne Handy shares information with us about her background, method and inspiration.

handy

How and when did you decide, or discover, that you were to be a writer?

I expressed myself in poetry when I was a small child. Everything I wrote was sing-song and end-rhymed, modeled on nursery rhymes. I continued in that vein throughout my teen-age years into adulthood. One day, another poet told me I was hopelessly out-of-date. I immediately began taking poetry classes. That’s when I developed a style incorporating inner rhyme and other devices to bring greater meaning to my poetry.

Describe your writing process.

Over the years, I’ve developed a process where I work a theme into a poem, research elements, then revise, revise, and revise, until the poem sounds right. Then I send my poems to an editor. She always points out what I missed. More revisions.

Mornings are great for creating; afternoons and evenings, best for editing.

What was the inspiration behind what you’ll be reading at Waterline?

Some of the poems I’m reading at Waterline are intensely personal. I had to wait years to sort through my feelings so I could write them.

What are you working on now?

I’m taking an online class through Poetry Barn, focusing on ekphrastic poetry. My current subject is a Romare Bearden silkscreen, Cattle of the Sun God, which relocates Chapter XII of the The Odyssey to Africa. The painting is part of a series. The assignment is to emulate Bearden by expanding a poem into a series.

I continue to work on poems inspired by a recent trip to Ireland, England, and Scotland.

Nov 142016
 

abatangelo

How and when did you decide, or discover, that you were to be a writer?

I’m not sure when I realized writing was something that was important to me.  I haven’t really made an effort to get things published so, in some ways, I feel like my writing is a selfish endeavor and not how I would describe myself.  But, it’s probably been about the years that I have started to put effort into performance poetry.

Describe your writing process.

No clear process or established writing time.  If an idea comes into my head I start a poem if I have time.  Otherwise I have a list of poem ideas I follow up on.  I usually write on my phone on the bus or train.

I practice my poems in the car when I can.

What was the inspiration behind what you’ll be reading at Waterline?

My poems are usually inspired by personal stories.  Usually an idea pops into my head and what ends up in paper is something different and not entirely expected.  “Four Right Turns” is about my dad’s Alzheimer’s.  I’m pretty sure he bribed the guy when I got my license and when he went to renew his license I was stunned because he got it renewed although it was obvious that his faculties weren’t there.  People have said I turned the filthiest joke into the most beautiful poem but I think some people don’t get past the filthy joke.

“Kiss Like a Dead Fish” is about the pain of losing someone and how you can’t place the last kiss.

What are you working on now?

Just writing new stuff and focusing on getting some poems published.

Nov 132016
 

Head to Water Street Studios to hear our featured readers on Sunday, November 20th at 7 PM! William Hazelgrove reveals the untold story of Madam President, The Secret Presidency of Edith Wilson; Sandra Marchetti weaves words and images into poems of seamless beauty; Dave Abatangelo shifts the slam poetry scene a bit with his sage (read only slightly gray) perspectives; Lynne Handy folds life’s most difficult hands into her heart and mind with the grace of poetry; and Patrick Shannon gives us survival tips on “How To Pick Out a Good Pub in Dublin”!

Books will be available for signing and purchase! Beer and wine available for $5. Our Open Mic follows. Anyone may bring a 5-minute piece to share!

Oct 182016
 

Thanks to Chuck Bennorth for the pictures!