Oct 112017
 

I think writing just evolved from being a visual artist. I began using words in paintings then books as sculptures and eventually words as poems.”

How did you discover that you were a writer?

I think writing just evolved from being a visual artist. I began using words in paintings then books as sculptures and eventually words as poems. In the beginning, poems were coming to me either when I was trying to sleep just before waking. I never studied writing so I am still learning by reading, listening and writing. I am fairly new to writing since I started when my children were in high school, college and married. I am still discovering.

Describe your writing process.

I write whenever or wherever I can on any scrap of paper I find if I don’t have my notebook. Much of my writing is done in the car while my husband drives, in waiting rooms or while the TV is on. I do not outline. For me, the poem would lose a lot if I did. I often ask questions in my poems. Sometimes in life, there are no answers. I think all forms of art should in some way cause a person to think. I try to do that.

What was the inspiration behind what you’ll be reading at Waterline?

Perhaps not specific to each poem, but overall, much of my work is about memories from my childhood. Some is inspired by nature and placing oneself in the position of another creature. Also, many of my poems are about grief, loss and the different ways in which we cope with them.

What are you working on now?

I am putting together a small book of feminist poems and plan to get back to a novel I started. Also, I am always writing more poems and experimenting with new ideas and styles.

What was the last great thing you read by another author?

The Book Thief by Markus Zusak.

You’re organizing a literary dinner party. Which writer, dead or alive, do you invite?

I would have trouble choosing just one. Annie Dillard and Maya Angelou, very different personalities, but we could have really interesting conversations.