Apr 122018
 

I’d invite Jane Austen [to dinner], whose sharp wit and brilliant control of satire would provide a lively commentary on the current political scene that would no doubt rival Colbert, Oliver, and SNL, among others.”

What was the inspiration behind what you’ll be reading at Waterline?

The inspiration for my chapbook, Ghost Garden, was the desire to connect with my Italian roots. After I retired from teaching a few years ago, I had time to research my family tree and discovered hundreds of Italian ancestors and also a few living cousins with whom I have become close friends. Together we have visited “our” village in southern Italy and walked the cobbled streets of our grandmothers, linking arms with each other and the past.

What are you working on now?

Current projects include preparing for a reading of my latest full-length poetry collection, EDGES, for First Presbyterian Church in Wheaton, and participating in Poetry Month displays at Chicago and suburban libraries.

What was the last great thing you read by another author?

Latest “good reads” include A Gentleman from Moscow by Amor Towles and Lillian Boxfish Takes a Walk by Kathleen Rooney. One is by an established author, the other new, and they are polar opposites in plot, style, and characters. But both books are brimming with the kind of exquisite prose, particularly  the “voices” of their narrators, that inspire me as a poet.

You’re organizing a literary dinner party. Which writer, dead or alive, do you invite?

I’d invite Jane Austen, whose sharp wit and brilliant control of satire would provide a lively commentary on the current political scene that would no doubt rival Colbert, Oliver, and SNL, among others.

 Leave a Reply

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <s> <strike> <strong>

(required)

(required)