Sep 142017
 

I wrote “extra credit” stories as a 1960s grade-schooler and won the “Gutenberg of the Atomic Age” award, though that appropriately acknowledged the nuns’ appreciation of my printing ability for school event signage rather than any of my creative compositions.”

How and when did you decide or discover that you were to be a writer?

I wrote “extra credit” stories as a 1960s grade-schooler and won the “Gutenberg of the Atomic Age” award, though that appropriately acknowledged the nuns’ appreciation of my printing ability for school event signage rather than any of my creative compositions.

In high school I filled the first few pages of a notebook with some really bad poetry.

At the conclusion of the college years, three of my best friends and I committed to “keeping in touch” via an annual letter, followed by a gathering several weeks thereafter, a “Symposium,” to discuss the correspondence. Forty-three years later and true to our pledge, our discourses, addressing topics esoteric to mundane, fill multiple volumes. My friends would compliment the humorous bent and laugh out loud moments sprinkled throughout my letters. With a number of those involving fishing related experiences, I acted on their suggestion to submit articles to outdoor periodicals, all of which were published. Further buoyed by those little successes and the availability of extra time resulting from retirement, I embarked on a significantly more involved project—my memoir—playfully told, with my love of fishing woven throughout.

Describe your writing process.

Pour ½ ounce of Rock and Rye cordial into a snifter.

Ascend staircase to loft-located writing desk, taking care not to trip and spill snifter contents.

Light “Dream by the Fire” Yankee Candle.

Load 5-disc changer, alternating Native American flute and Led Zeppelin CDs.

Turn on computer and activate Word program.

Stare at blank screen as its paralyzing whiteness smothers the creative soul.

Answer with a sip of Rock and Rye and begin typing.

(Honest!)

I need a block of several uninterrupted hours to feel comfortable getting started. Time of day does not matter, though if it is morning or early afternoon I’ll judiciously skip the Rock and Rye component. My writing method is slow and methodical (I’m on my second hour just answering this question) with continuous revisions, sometimes to the point of reworking, multiple times, the sentence last completed. I’m amazed anything ever gets finished!

What was the inspiration behind what you’ll be reading at Waterline?

In my case, it was “who,” and the answer is EVE. (That’ll make sense if you attend Sunday’s event!)

What are you working on now?

I’m in the early stages of a piece (short story, or maybe longer…) with the working title, The Unusual Life of Logan Mayonnaise.

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